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Budgeting for the Public and Non-Profit Sectors

Learn how to monitor budgets, manage finances, and take financial control.

Budgeting for the Public and Non-Profit Sectors

Learn how to monitor budgets, manage finances, and take financial control.
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An introduction to the course, going through the course content so that participants can identify the areas that will be covered.
This lecture gives a definition of a budget for both expenditure and income.
Complete this task before the next lecture.
Each step of the monitoring process is explained and consideration is given to who in the organization should be involved in the monitoring process.
Getting the "actuals" right is the first step in the monitoring process. This lecture considers all the elements that should be included in order to establish the base from which to monitor the budget.
Complete this task and check your answer against the suggested solution.
This is the suggested solution for the "Establishing "Actual" Expenditure" exercise.
Income budgets need to be monitored just as much as expenditure budgets. This lecture describes the monitoring process and the importance of ensuring that income is received.
Accounting for committed expenditure is one of the differences between management accounting and financial accounting. This lecture explains commitment accounting and how it helps budget holders control and manage their budgets.
Check your understanding by completing this exercise and checking your answers with the suggested solution.
This lecture explains what variance is in the context of budget monitoring. Variance analysis is a key technique, which budget holders must learn to use. The terminology is described and a simple example is given.
Variance calculations are described in-depth with illustrations, including how to calculate a percentage variance. Variances may be presented in a variety of ways on management reports, and the learner is shown some examples of this.
Practice calculating variances with this self-development exercise and compare your answers with the suggested solutions.
When the variances have been calculated they have to be interpreted and analyzed if they are to be useful to the budget holder. Finding out and understanding the reasons and causes of variances is a fundamental part of the monitoring process. This lecture identifies the most common reasons.
Make your assumptions about the reasons for variances and compare them to the suggested solutions.
Having understood the cause of the variance, this lecture identifies some of the actions that can be taken to control the variance. It also distinguishes between variances that are controllable and those that are uncontrollable. This lecture moves the budget holder towards the next section of budgetary control.
This task considers the techniques learned about variance analysis and how this can be applied to your own organization. It will help to put the theory into practice.
In order to control budgets, budget holders need to understand the concept of budget drivers. This lecture describes budget drivers and their importance to both setting the original budget, and monitoring and controlling the budget.
Undertake this exercise and compare your answers to the suggested solutions.
This lecture provides practical examples of budget drivers for different types of service area. This will help in assisting budget holders to identify the budget drivers that impact on their own budgets.
Projecting the outturn is a useful technique for budget holders to use in monitoring and controlling their budgets.
This lecture shows how to calculate outturns in different scenarios. It will show the budget holder how best to accurately estimate future expenditure or income, and make forward plans to meet budgetary control objectives. Ideally, calculating outturns should form part of a budget holder's regular monitoring and control routine.
Calculate the outturns for the scenarios in the exercise and check your figures with the suggested solutions.
This lecture describes the type of control actions that a budget holder could take in order to control their budgets. Having used the techniques covered in the previous lectures, the actions should be based on solid foundations, and be practical in nature.
This activity should be undertaken in relation to your own organization.
To ensure that control actions are having an impact, and are being effective, it is important that they are monitored in a routine way. Monitoring outcomes is part of the process and should highlight whether or not the actions taken are controlling the budget whilst continuing to meet organizational objectives.
Undertake this exercise and compare your answers with the suggested solutions.
This lecture describes the difference between financial accounts and management accounts and highlights the common factors between the two. Budget holders require good financial management information in order to monitor and control budgets.
This is the suggested solution to the quick quiz at the end of video 17.
There are many different types of monitoring information, and they are not all financial. This lecture describes and gives examples of the types of monitoring information a budget holder would find useful.
This is an activity to be undertaken in relation to your own organization.
Budget monitoring reports can be presented in a wide range of different formats and have variable content. The budget holder should consider the type of information they require which would best enable them to monitor and control their budgets.
Consider your organization's financial management reports, and identify how they are used.
This lecture gives a summary of the content of this course, along with next steps for further learning.

This course focuses on the importance of delivering service objectives with the funds allocated and achieving value for money. This is particularly important in the public and non-profit sectors which often face financial constraints. It is an ideal course for anyone who has financial responsibilities but has no formal financial training. This includes budget holders, managers, and anyone responsible for spending their organization's funds.

This is a comprehensive course delivered by experts and will provide an excellent opportunity to develop and improve skills and knowledge in this area. On completion of this course, learners can obtain a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) certificate, which they can add to their resume.

Learners will gain the tools and techniques to cope with the demands of budget management. We explain terminology and set out best practice processes and procedures, and provide ideas to manage more difficult budgets.

What will you learn in this course?

  • Budget Monitoring
  • Commitment Accounting
  • Variance Analysis
  • Budgetary Control Techniques
  • Financial Management Information

Each section has a number of video presentations along with self-development exercises.

An introduction to the course, going through the course content so that participants can identify the areas that will be covered.
This lecture gives a definition of a budget for both expenditure and income.
Complete this task before the next lecture.
Each step of the monitoring process is explained and consideration is given to who in the organization should be involved in the monitoring process.
Getting the "actuals" right is the first step in the monitoring process. This lecture considers all the elements that should be included in order to establish the base from which to monitor the budget.
Complete this task and check your answer against the suggested solution.
This is the suggested solution for the "Establishing "Actual" Expenditure" exercise.
Income budgets need to be monitored just as much as expenditure budgets. This lecture describes the monitoring process and the importance of ensuring that income is received.
Accounting for committed expenditure is one of the differences between management accounting and financial accounting. This lecture explains commitment accounting and how it helps budget holders control and manage their budgets.
Check your understanding by completing this exercise and checking your answers with the suggested solution.
This lecture explains what variance is in the context of budget monitoring. Variance analysis is a key technique, which budget holders must learn to use. The terminology is described and a simple example is given.
Variance calculations are described in-depth with illustrations, including how to calculate a percentage variance. Variances may be presented in a variety of ways on management reports, and the learner is shown some examples of this.
Practice calculating variances with this self-development exercise and compare your answers with the suggested solutions.
When the variances have been calculated they have to be interpreted and analyzed if they are to be useful to the budget holder. Finding out and understanding the reasons and causes of variances is a fundamental part of the monitoring process. This lecture identifies the most common reasons.
Make your assumptions about the reasons for variances and compare them to the suggested solutions.
Having understood the cause of the variance, this lecture identifies some of the actions that can be taken to control the variance. It also distinguishes between variances that are controllable and those that are uncontrollable. This lecture moves the budget holder towards the next section of budgetary control.
This task considers the techniques learned about variance analysis and how this can be applied to your own organization. It will help to put the theory into practice.
In order to control budgets, budget holders need to understand the concept of budget drivers. This lecture describes budget drivers and their importance to both setting the original budget, and monitoring and controlling the budget.
Undertake this exercise and compare your answers to the suggested solutions.
This lecture provides practical examples of budget drivers for different types of service area. This will help in assisting budget holders to identify the budget drivers that impact on their own budgets.
Projecting the outturn is a useful technique for budget holders to use in monitoring and controlling their budgets.
This lecture shows how to calculate outturns in different scenarios. It will show the budget holder how best to accurately estimate future expenditure or income, and make forward plans to meet budgetary control objectives. Ideally, calculating outturns should form part of a budget holder's regular monitoring and control routine.
Calculate the outturns for the scenarios in the exercise and check your figures with the suggested solutions.
This lecture describes the type of control actions that a budget holder could take in order to control their budgets. Having used the techniques covered in the previous lectures, the actions should be based on solid foundations, and be practical in nature.
This activity should be undertaken in relation to your own organization.
To ensure that control actions are having an impact, and are being effective, it is important that they are monitored in a routine way. Monitoring outcomes is part of the process and should highlight whether or not the actions taken are controlling the budget whilst continuing to meet organizational objectives.
Undertake this exercise and compare your answers with the suggested solutions.
This lecture describes the difference between financial accounts and management accounts and highlights the common factors between the two. Budget holders require good financial management information in order to monitor and control budgets.
This is the suggested solution to the quick quiz at the end of video 17.
There are many different types of monitoring information, and they are not all financial. This lecture describes and gives examples of the types of monitoring information a budget holder would find useful.
This is an activity to be undertaken in relation to your own organization.
Budget monitoring reports can be presented in a wide range of different formats and have variable content. The budget holder should consider the type of information they require which would best enable them to monitor and control their budgets.
Consider your organization's financial management reports, and identify how they are used.
This lecture gives a summary of the content of this course, along with next steps for further learning.

About the instructors

H B Publications & Training International

Developing finance skills for the public and non-profit sectors
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The main instructors are Jennifer Bean and Lascelles Hussey who are the founders and directors of HB Publications and Training International. They are Chartered Accountants and MBA graduates with over 30 years of training and consultancy experience. Their expertise is to take business principles and apply them to a public sector/ non-profit environment in an easy, user-friendly, and practical way. 

They have delivered training programmes in finance related topics to thousands of individuals working in the public and non profit sectors. They provide tailored training to meet specific organisational needs, as well as delivering open courses from their developed product range. Clients include public authorities, local government agencies, health organisations, educational institutions, universities, housing organisations, arts and community enterprises, etc. 

They have demonstrated their expertise and experience in the form of a series of management books entitled "Essential Skills for the Public Sector", titles include Managing the Devolved Budget, Finance for Non Financial Public Sector Managers, and Costing and Pricing Public Sector services. All are available on Amazon and at leading bookstores.

HB Publications and Training International has a mission to improve skills and competency in the public sector. The company has developed a number of online assessments which can be used to indicate training needs and measure continuous improvement. For more information visit our website www.hbpublications.com

 

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