Get a month of TabletWise Pro for free! Click here to redeem 
 

Organizational Change - Introduction to Change Models

Tools of the trade - understanding what needs doing & ways to get there.

Organizational Change - Introduction to Change Models

Tools of the trade - understanding what needs doing & ways to get there.
32
Views
1:05:49
Share the link to this class
Copied
Welcome to “Introduction to Change Models.” There is often great confusion around the many Change Models, but this course lays out a classification scheme based on purpose and helps the change leader know which model works best at various points in the change project. We will also dive into how change can be classified since different types of change demand different approaches. But first – what do you know about organizational change and how did you learn it? Probably from an unpleasant experience of a change initiative being poorly defined and implemented even worse. However, it does not have to be this way and knowledge gained in this course will put you that much further ahead of those who fail at change management. Upon completion of this course, you will understand the basic change model classifications and some of the models that are available for each classification.
However, before we get to your situation, let us discuss a more basic question How are you going to evaluate Success in Your Learning? Kirkpatrick modeled a four-tier structure for learning effectiveness (download the attached document).
Introduction to Change Models and why they need to be Organized by Purpose to make any sense of them.
Change Resistance Models generally describe the stages people go through when grieving the loss of a known past and fear of an unknown future. (While interesting, the best approach is to recognize the many ways resistance can develop and mitigate those reasons, so you do not have to face resistance. Unfortunately, too many change leaders ignore this advice and deal with resistance as it surely arises.)
Now that you know a bit about how Change Models have different purposes, we need to shift to how you can classify the type of change you are facing? Reality – the Change Challenge we face - Often Need Adaptive Change - Sometimes Need Transformative Change - Too Often Settle for Transitional Change - Too Often Get Disruptive Change
There are many ways to classify change and how the impact accumulates over time. Degree of difficulty is not uniform across types of change. This lesson has the change terminology that is often encountered in org-change discussions. Terms such as developmental, transactional, transformative, incremental, disruptive, and emergent will all start to make sense in other settings.
This page is from my upcoming eBook “DIY Change Management – The Essentials plus Tools.” It is available here as a desktop reference as you plan and implement your organizational change initiative.
Knowing some change terminology from the last lesson, we now examine how change difficulty can be classified. New terminology includes proactive, reactive, planned, learning loops, etc.
This lesson introduces the four primary ways change happens (planned, debate-synthesis, life-cycle, and evolutionary). While these change processes are rarely used alone, you will see them used in practice when employing the change models mentioned above. Knowing a bit about this foundation will help you understand why some parts of each model are the way they are. You will frequently see the planned (goal setting) process in many change models. The dialectic (debate-synthesis) is frequently encountered in individual change models. Life-cycle will already be familiar to you and aids in some of the diagnostic models. Evolutionary change processes are often overlooked in traditional, top-down change approaches, but provide a good understanding of emergent change and how change can be viewed from a complexity science perspective.
This lesson dives into each of the four primary change processes with a diagram of how they are constructed and how they are used.

I designed this course with the idea that newcomers to organizational change are often needlessly confused when presented a toolbox full of change models without instructions on how to pick the right tool for the job they face. Some of this confusion can be traced back to many authors and instructors who throw the term “Change Models” around freely, ignoring the very different purposes and perspectives on the change process. This online course is an attempt to cut through this confusion with a classification scheme that ties the model choice to the purpose served in the change project. Further, by approaching model choice from a “purpose” perspective, the change leader can narrow the models to those most appropriate and avoid using a hammer when a screwdriver is needed.

This course is for the manager who is facing challenges and needs a pathway to a solution. Content for the course comes from 40+ years of professional and academic experience - practical solutions with supporting resources. This course is NOT for those wanting entertainment.  (However, I can provide some recommendations for cat videos on request.)

Requirements

The only requirement is an interest in improving yourself and the organization where you work.

Welcome to “Introduction to Change Models.” There is often great confusion around the many Change Models, but this course lays out a classification scheme based on purpose and helps the change leader know which model works best at various points in the change project. We will also dive into how change can be classified since different types of change demand different approaches. But first – what do you know about organizational change and how did you learn it? Probably from an unpleasant experience of a change initiative being poorly defined and implemented even worse. However, it does not have to be this way and knowledge gained in this course will put you that much further ahead of those who fail at change management. Upon completion of this course, you will understand the basic change model classifications and some of the models that are available for each classification.
However, before we get to your situation, let us discuss a more basic question How are you going to evaluate Success in Your Learning? Kirkpatrick modeled a four-tier structure for learning effectiveness (download the attached document).
Introduction to Change Models and why they need to be Organized by Purpose to make any sense of them.
Change Resistance Models generally describe the stages people go through when grieving the loss of a known past and fear of an unknown future. (While interesting, the best approach is to recognize the many ways resistance can develop and mitigate those reasons, so you do not have to face resistance. Unfortunately, too many change leaders ignore this advice and deal with resistance as it surely arises.)
Now that you know a bit about how Change Models have different purposes, we need to shift to how you can classify the type of change you are facing? Reality – the Change Challenge we face - Often Need Adaptive Change - Sometimes Need Transformative Change - Too Often Settle for Transitional Change - Too Often Get Disruptive Change
There are many ways to classify change and how the impact accumulates over time. Degree of difficulty is not uniform across types of change. This lesson has the change terminology that is often encountered in org-change discussions. Terms such as developmental, transactional, transformative, incremental, disruptive, and emergent will all start to make sense in other settings.
This page is from my upcoming eBook “DIY Change Management – The Essentials plus Tools.” It is available here as a desktop reference as you plan and implement your organizational change initiative.
Knowing some change terminology from the last lesson, we now examine how change difficulty can be classified. New terminology includes proactive, reactive, planned, learning loops, etc.
This lesson introduces the four primary ways change happens (planned, debate-synthesis, life-cycle, and evolutionary). While these change processes are rarely used alone, you will see them used in practice when employing the change models mentioned above. Knowing a bit about this foundation will help you understand why some parts of each model are the way they are. You will frequently see the planned (goal setting) process in many change models. The dialectic (debate-synthesis) is frequently encountered in individual change models. Life-cycle will already be familiar to you and aids in some of the diagnostic models. Evolutionary change processes are often overlooked in traditional, top-down change approaches, but provide a good understanding of emergent change and how change can be viewed from a complexity science perspective.
This lesson dives into each of the four primary change processes with a diagram of how they are constructed and how they are used.

About the instructors

Dr. Ross Wirth

Professor & org-change consultant
Share the instructor profile
Copied

Dr. Wirth is a recognied educator and org-change practitioner who now focuses his time to help others learn what he has mastered over the past 40+ years. 

Top Business Classes

New Business Classes

All Classes
Free for 30 Days
   The video is currently being processed.
   An error occurred while uploading the video. Please upload another video.
   Please upload the required file.
Quiz: #TITLE#
Questions: #QUESTIONS_COUNT#
Quiz: #TITLE#
Question /#QUESTIONS_COUNT#
Quiz: #TITLE#
Result: You correctly answered out of questions. Result: You correctly answered out of question. Result: You correctly answered out of questions attempted. Result: You correctly answered out of question attempted. Result: You did not attempt any question.
1
Save
32
Views
This class has not been saved

Sign Up