Clicky

TabletWise.com
    Pharmacy Website
    Clinic Website
     

    Antidepressants

    Health    Antidepressants
    Also called: SSRIs, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, Tricyclic antidepressants

    Antidepressants are medicines that treat depression. Your doctor can prescribe them for you. They work to balance some of the natural chemicals in our brains. It may take several weeks for them to help. There are several types of antidepressants. You and your doctor may have to try a few before finding what works best for you.

    Antidepressants may cause mild side effects that usually do not last long. These may include headache, nausea, sleep problems, restlessness, and sexual problems. Tell your doctor if you have any side effects. You should also let your doctor know if you take any other medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements.

    It is important to keep taking your medicines, even if you feel better. Do not stop taking your medicines without talking to your doctor. You often need to stop antidepressants gradually.

    NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

    Related Topics - Antidepressants

    Questions - Antidepressants

    A decision to use the antidepressant drug during pregnancy or breastfeeding is based on the balance between risks and positive outcomes. There is not a specific antidepressant that is considered to be safe completely during pregnancy. There are always some negative effects that are associated with drugs taken during pregnancy. However, the overall risk of birth defects for babies of mothers who take antidepressants during pregnancy is low. There are certain antidepressants like paroxetine that may not be recommended during pregnancy.
    
    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) use in pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortions of about 1.7-fold and can cause preterm birth and low birth weight. A systematic review of the risk of major birth defects in antidepressant-exposed pregnancies found a small increase in the risk of major malformations and cardiovascular birth defects. FDA has specified paroxetine-induced birth defects and has advised that Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) should be avoided during pregnancy.
    
    A systematic review in 2013 and meta-analysis reported that antidepressant use during pregnancy was significantly associated with some pregnancy risks, such as gestational age and preterm birth, but not with other outcomes. A neonate (baby less than 28 days old) may experience a withdrawal syndrome from the discontinuation of the antidepressant at birth.
    
    Patients should consult their doctor to find the best possible way to manage depression when expecting a baby or planning on becoming pregnant.
    
    References
    1. Wikipedia Antidepressant URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidepressant#Pregnancy Accessed December 27, 2017
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    A decision to use the antidepressant drug during pregnancy or breastfeeding is based on the balance between risks and positive outcomes. There is not a specific antidepressant that is considered to be safe completely during pregnancy. There are always some negative effects that are associated with drugs taken during pregnancy. However, the overall risk of birth defects for babies of mothers who take antidepressants during pregnancy is low. There are certain antidepressants like paroxetine that may not be recommended during pregnancy.
    
    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) use in pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortions of about 1.7-fold and can cause preterm birth and low birth weight. A systematic review of the risk of major birth defects in antidepressant-exposed pregnancies found a small increase in the risk of major malformations and cardiovascular birth defects. FDA has specified paroxetine-induced birth defects and has advised that Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) should be avoided during pregnancy.
    
    A systematic review in 2013 and meta-analysis reported that antidepressant use during pregnancy was significantly associated with some pregnancy risks, such as gestational age and preterm birth, but not with other outcomes. A neonate (baby less than 28 days old) may experience a withdrawal syndrome from the discontinuation of the antidepressant at birth.
    
    Patients should consult their doctor to find the best possible way to manage depression when expecting a baby or planning on becoming pregnant.
    
    References
    1. Wikipedia Antidepressant URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidepressant#Pregnancy Accessed December 27, 2017
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    A decision to use the antidepressant drug during pregnancy or breastfeeding is based on the balance between risks and positive outcomes. There is not a specific antidepressant that is considered to be safe completely during pregnancy. There are always some negative effects that are associated with drugs taken during pregnancy. However, the overall risk of birth defects for babies of mothers who take antidepressants during pregnancy is low. There are certain antidepressants like paroxetine that may not be recommended during pregnancy.
    
    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) use in pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortions of about 1.7-fold and can cause preterm birth and low birth weight. A systematic review of the risk of major birth defects in antidepressant-exposed pregnancies found a small increase in the risk of major malformations and cardiovascular birth defects. FDA has specified paroxetine-induced birth defects and has advised that Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) should be avoided during pregnancy.
    
    A systematic review in 2013 and meta-analysis reported that antidepressant use during pregnancy was significantly associated with some pregnancy risks, such as gestational age and preterm birth, but not with other outcomes. A neonate (baby less than 28 days old) may experience a withdrawal syndrome from the discontinuation of the antidepressant at birth.
    
    Patients should consult their doctor to find the best possible way to manage depression when expecting a baby or planning on becoming pregnant.
    
    References
    1. Wikipedia Antidepressant URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidepressant#Pregnancy Accessed December 27, 2017
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    Antidepressants play a key part in the treatment of depression as they aim at relieving the symptoms and preventing the comeback of depression. Depression is primarily caused by an imbalance of certain chemicals like serotonin that results in affecting some nerve connections. The major aim of the antidepressants is increasing the availability of such chemicals.However, antidepressants like other medications, also show side effects such as dry mouth, headaches, feel faint, anxious, and have a decreased sex drive.
    
    Antidepressants have shown to cause a change in weight. According to a study published in 2006, a pattern of acute weight loss was observed with duloxetine, later followed by weight gain after longer-term treatment that appeared to be modest and possibly dose-related. A similar pattern was observed in studies of fluoxetine and sertraline too.
    
    Duloxetine was found to have minimal short-term and long-term effects on weight for the majority of patients. It might prove to be an acceptable therapy especially when effects on weight are a consideration in the selection of medication of depression.
    
    As some of the cases have shown both weight loss and weight gain, patients concerned about their weight changes while taking duloxetine, should consult their healthcare provider or physician.
    
    References
    1. Wise TN, Perahia DG, Pangallo BA, Losin WG, Wiltse CG. Effects of the antidepressant duloxetine on body weight: analyses of 10 clinical studies. Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;8(5):269-78 URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1764530/
    2. PubMed Depression: How effective are antidepressants? URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0087089/
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    Antidepressants play a key part in the treatment of depression as they aim at relieving the symptoms and preventing the comeback of depression. Depression is primarily caused by an imbalance of certain chemicals like serotonin that results in affecting some nerve connections. The major aim of the antidepressants is increasing the availability of such chemicals.However, antidepressants like other medications, also show side effects such as dry mouth, headaches, feel faint, anxious, and have a decreased sex drive.
    
    Antidepressants have shown to cause a change in weight. According to a study published in 2006, a pattern of acute weight loss was observed with duloxetine, later followed by weight gain after longer-term treatment that appeared to be modest and possibly dose-related. A similar pattern was observed in studies of fluoxetine and sertraline too.
    
    Duloxetine was found to have minimal short-term and long-term effects on weight for the majority of patients. It might prove to be an acceptable therapy especially when effects on weight are a consideration in the selection of medication of depression.
    
    As some of the cases have shown both weight loss and weight gain, patients concerned about their weight changes while taking duloxetine, should consult their healthcare provider or physician.
    
    References
    1. Wise TN, Perahia DG, Pangallo BA, Losin WG, Wiltse CG. Effects of the antidepressant duloxetine on body weight: analyses of 10 clinical studies. Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;8(5):269-78 URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1764530/
    2. PubMed Depression: How effective are antidepressants? URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0087089/
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    Antidepressants play a key part in the treatment of depression as they aim at relieving the symptoms and preventing the comeback of depression. Depression is primarily caused by an imbalance of certain chemicals like serotonin that results in affecting some nerve connections. The major aim of the antidepressants is increasing the availability of such chemicals.However, antidepressants like other medications, also show side effects such as dry mouth, headaches, feel faint, anxious, and have a decreased sex drive.
    
    Antidepressants have shown to cause a change in weight. According to a study published in 2006, a pattern of acute weight loss was observed with duloxetine, later followed by weight gain after longer-term treatment that appeared to be modest and possibly dose-related. A similar pattern was observed in studies of fluoxetine and sertraline too.
    
    Duloxetine was found to have minimal short-term and long-term effects on weight for the majority of patients. It might prove to be an acceptable therapy especially when effects on weight are a consideration in the selection of medication of depression.
    
    As some of the cases have shown both weight loss and weight gain, patients concerned about their weight changes while taking duloxetine, should consult their healthcare provider or physician.
    
    References
    1. Wise TN, Perahia DG, Pangallo BA, Losin WG, Wiltse CG. Effects of the antidepressant duloxetine on body weight: analyses of 10 clinical studies. Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;8(5):269-78 URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1764530/
    2. PubMed Depression: How effective are antidepressants? URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0087089/
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    Antidepressants play a key part in the treatment of depression as they aim at relieving the symptoms and preventing the comeback of depression. Depression is primarily caused by an imbalance of certain chemicals like serotonin that results in affecting some nerve connections. The major aim of the antidepressants is increasing the availability of such chemicals.However, antidepressants like other medications, also show side effects such as dry mouth, headaches, feel faint, anxious, and have a decreased sex drive.
    
    Antidepressants have shown to cause a change in weight. According to a study published in 2006, a pattern of acute weight loss was observed with duloxetine, later followed by weight gain after longer-term treatment that appeared to be modest and possibly dose-related. A similar pattern was observed in studies of fluoxetine and sertraline too.
    
    Duloxetine was found to have minimal short-term and long-term effects on weight for the majority of patients. It might prove to be an acceptable therapy especially when effects on weight are a consideration in the selection of medication of depression.
    
    As some of the cases have shown both weight loss and weight gain, patients concerned about their weight changes while taking duloxetine, should consult their healthcare provider or physician.
    
    References
    1. Wise TN, Perahia DG, Pangallo BA, Losin WG, Wiltse CG. Effects of the antidepressant duloxetine on body weight: analyses of 10 clinical studies. Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;8(5):269-78 URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1764530/
    2. PubMed Depression: How effective are antidepressants? URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0087089/
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    Antidepressants play a key part in the treatment of depression as they aim at relieving the symptoms and preventing the comeback of depression. Depression is primarily caused by an imbalance of certain chemicals like serotonin that results in affecting some nerve connections. The major aim of the antidepressants is increasing the availability of such chemicals.However, antidepressants like other medications, also show side effects such as dry mouth, headaches, feel faint, anxious, and have a decreased sex drive.
    
    Antidepressants have shown to cause a change in weight. According to a study published in 2006, a pattern of acute weight loss was observed with duloxetine, later followed by weight gain after longer-term treatment that appeared to be modest and possibly dose-related. A similar pattern was observed in studies of fluoxetine and sertraline too.
    
    Duloxetine was found to have minimal short-term and long-term effects on weight for the majority of patients. It might prove to be an acceptable therapy especially when effects on weight are a consideration in the selection of medication of depression.
    
    As some of the cases have shown both weight loss and weight gain, patients concerned about their weight changes while taking duloxetine, should consult their healthcare provider or physician.
    
    References
    1. Wise TN, Perahia DG, Pangallo BA, Losin WG, Wiltse CG. Effects of the antidepressant duloxetine on body weight: analyses of 10 clinical studies. Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;8(5):269-78 URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1764530/
    2. PubMed Depression: How effective are antidepressants? URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0087089/
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    During antidepressant treatment weight gain can be either a sign of improvement in patients who have lost weight as a symptom of depression or a residual symptom in patients who overeat when depressed. Weight gain is a most attainable side effect of many antidepressant drugs. However, significant weight gain during the acute phase of treatment or weight gain that continues despite achieving full remission of depressive symptoms is also likely to be a side effect of antidepressant treatment.
    
    Every patient responds differently to the treatment, the following antidepressant drugs are more likely to cause weight gain/loss during your treatment.
    
    1. SSRIs: These are the most commonly prescribed class of drugs. Long-term use of the following SSRI drugs may cause weight gain e.g. citalopram (Celexa), sertraline (Zoloft), fluoxetine (Prozac). However, some SSRIs are related to weight loss at first, long-term use of SSRIs is mostly linked to weight gain. Treatment that lasts longer than six months is considered as long-term use of the drug.
    
    2. Tricyclic antidepressants: They are also known as cyclic antidepressants or TCAs, which can cause weight gain. The drugs include e.g. doxepin (Adapin), amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), imipramine (Tofranil-PM).
    TCAs were the drugs firstly approved to treat depression. They are not prescribed anymore because newer treatments cause fewer side effects. Weight gain was a common reason people stopped treatment with these types of antidepressants, according to a 1984 study.
    
    3. MAOIs: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) were the first class of antidepressants to be developed. MAOIs that cause weight gain are e.g. isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil). Due to certain side effects and safety concerns, MAOIs are most often prescribed when other classes don’t work. According to 1988, phenelzine is the most likely to result in weight gain. A new formulation of selegiline (Emsam), has been shown to result in weight loss during treatment.
    
    4. Atypical antidepressants: Mirtazapine (Remeron) is a noradrenergic antagonist an example of atypical antidepressant. This drug repeatedly showed the weight gain and increase in appetite than other drugs whereas, mirtazapine shows less weight gain as compared to TCAs.
    
    5. SNRIs: These were recommended as a first line agent for the treatment of the major depressive disorder (MDD) e.g. Duloxetine (Cymbalta), Venlafaxine (Effexor). But the most common side effect of it includes loss of appetite, weight, and sleep. Due to this, over the past two decades, second-generation antidepressants have gradually replaced first-generation antidepressants, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) as the drugs of choice for the treatment of MDD. This is because of their improved tolerability and safety profile.
    
    References
    1. Fava M. Weight gain and antidepressants. J Clin Psychiatry. 2000;61 Suppl 11:37-41.URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10926053 Accessed November 24, 2017
    2. Aggarwal A, Jethani SL, Rohatgi RK, Kalra J. Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Induced Weight Changes: A Dose and Duration Dependent Study on Albino Rats. J Clin Diagn Res. 2016;10(3): AF01-3. URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27134853 Accessed November 24, 2017
    3. PubChem Duloxetine URL: https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/60835#section=Top Accessed November 24, 2017
    4. Stubbs C, Mattingly L, Crawford SA, Wickersham EA, Brockhaus JL, Mccarthy LH. Do SSRIs and SNRIs reduce the frequency and/or severity of hot flashes in menopausal women? J Okla State Med Assoc. 2017;110(5):272-274. URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28649145 Accessed November 24, 2017
    5. PubMed Health Isocarboxazid (By mouth) URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0010788/?report=details Accessed November 24, 2017
    Share
    Share the link to this answer
    During antidepressant treatment weight gain can be either a sign of improvement in patients who have lost weight as a symptom of depression or a residual symptom in patients who overeat when depressed. Weight gain is a most attainable side effect of many antidepressant drugs. However, significant weight gain during the acute phase of treatment or weight gain that continues despite achieving full remission of depressive symptoms is also likely to be a side effect of antidepressant treatment.
    
    Every patient responds differently to the treatment, the following antidepressant drugs are more likely to cause weight gain/loss during your treatment.
    
    1. SSRIs: These are the most commonly prescribed class of drugs. Long-term use of the following SSRI drugs may cause weight gain e.g. citalopram (Celexa), sertraline (Zoloft), fluoxetine (Prozac). However, some SSRIs are related to weight loss at first, long-term use of SSRIs is mostly linked to weight gain.Treatment that lasts longer than six months is considered as long-term use of the drug.
    
    2. Tricyclic antidepressants: They are also known as cyclic antidepressants or TCAs, which can cause weight gain. The drugs include e.g. doxepin (Adapin), amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), imipramine (Tofranil-PM).
    TCAs were the drugs firstly approved to treat depression. They are not prescribed anymore because newer treatments cause fewer side effects. Weight gain was a common reason people stopped treatment with these types of antidepressants, according to a 1984 study.
    
    3. MAOIs: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) were the first class of antidepressants to be developed. MAOIs that cause weight gain are e.g. isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil). Due to certain side effects and safety concerns, MAOIs are most often prescribed when other classes don’t work. According to 1988, phenelzine is the most likely to result in weight gain. A new formulation of selegiline (Emsam), has been shown to result in weight loss during treatment.
    
    4. Atypical antidepressants: Mirtazapine (Remeron) is a noradrenergic antagonist an example of atypical antidepressant. This drug repeatedly showed the weight gain and increase in appetite than other drugs whereas, mirtazapine shows less weight gain as compared to TCAs.
    
    5. SNRIs: These were recommended as a first line agent for the treatment of the major depressive disorder (MDD) e.g. Duloxetine (Cymbalta), Venlafaxine (Effexor). But the most common side effect of it includes loss of appetite, weight, and sleep. Due to this, over the past two decades, second-generation antidepressants have gradually replaced first-generation antidepressants, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) as the drugs of choice for the treatment of MDD. This is because of their improved tolerability and safety profile.
    
    References
    1. Fava M. Weight gain and antidepressants. J Clin Psychiatry. 2000;61 Suppl 11:37-41.URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10926053 Accessed November 24, 2017
    2. Aggarwal A, Jethani SL, Rohatgi RK, Kalra J. Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Induced Weight Changes: A Dose and Duration Dependent Study on Albino Rats. J Clin Diagn Res. 2016;10(3): AF01-3. URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27134853 Accessed November 24, 2017
    3. PubChem Duloxetine URL: https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/60835#section=Top Accessed November 24, 2017
    4. Stubbs C, Mattingly L, Crawford SA, Wickersham EA, Brockhaus JL, Mccarthy LH. Do SSRIs and SNRIs reduce the frequency and/or severity of hot flashes in menopausal women? J Okla State Med Assoc. 2017;110(5):272-274. URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28649145 Accessed November 24, 2017
    5. PubMed Health Isocarboxazid (By mouth) URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0010788/?report=details Accessed November 24, 2017
    Share
    Share the link to this answer

    News, Updates and Latest Articles - Antidepressants

    Latest news and updates related to Antidepressants. Subscribe to get latest posts via email or subscribe to a RSS feed.

    An Entirely New Type of Antidepressant Targets Postpartum Depression

    Wednesday, August 15, 2018 -- The steroid drug is intended to help women who suffer from the hormone-driven condition -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Do antidepressants cause weight gain?

    Tuesday, August 14, 2018 -- In a recent study published in The BMJ, researchers evaluated the long-term effects of antidepressant medication on weight gain. Obesity has become and continues to be a worldwide health problem. With 69% of the US adult population being overweight or obese and 61% of UK adults being overweight or obese, it has become a serious […] The post Do antidepressants cause weight gain? appeared first on Medical News Bulletin | Health News and Medical Research.

    New insight could help develop novel and more effective antidepressant drugs

    Friday, August 10, 2018 -- A new area in depression research suggests dysfunction in mitochondria -- the main source of energy for cells -- could lead to major depression.

    Antidepressants and Bleeding Risk: What's the Link?

    Wednesday, August 08, 2018 -- Results showed an increased risk of bleeding with SRIs by 1.16-2.36 times with an even higher 3.17- to 10.9-fold risk with concomitant NSAIDs.

    CDC: Use of Unapproved Opioid-Like Antidepressant on the Rise in the US

    Tuesday, August 07, 2018 -- While approved in Europe, Asia, and Latin America, tianeptine, an opioid receptor agonist, is an unscheduled pharmaceutical agent in the US that has been linked to serious adverse events, including death, when used for recreational purposes.

    Last updated date

    This page was last updated on 8/08/2018.
    This page provides information for Antidepressants.

    Related Topics - Antidepressants

    Recent Activity