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Why it's used

Lansoprazole is used for the short-term treatment and maintenance of small intestinal ulcers (duodenal ulcer). This medicine works by preventing the amount of acid production in the stomach by blocking an organic enzyme system. This medicine helps by reducing acid secretions in the stomach. Lansoprazole is also used for the short-term treatment of active benign stomach ulcers, to treat benign conditions of the stomach and intestinal ulcers in patients requiring continuous treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to reduce the risk of NSAIDs associated stomach and intestinal ulcers, for the short-term treatment of symptoms of backflow of stomach acid to the food pipe (gastroesophageal reflux disease) and inflammation in the lining of the food pipe (erosive esophagitis), for the long-term treatment of overproduction of gastric acid (Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome), and to prevent acid reflux from the stomach (reflux oesophagitis) in adults.
Lansoprazole may also be used together with other medicines to treat certain conditions as recommended by the doctor. It is used in combination with Amoxicillin, or Clarithromycin to reduce the reoccurrence of intestinal ulcers. It is also used with Amoxicillin to prevent & control the reoccurrence of intestinal ulcers by completely destroying the growth of Helicobacter pylori bacteria. It is also used with Clarithromycin, or Metronidazole to treat stomach ulcer due to bacterial infection (eradication of Helicobacter pylori).
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Lansoprazole is a prescription medicine that belongs to a class of medicines called Proton Pump Inhibitors. Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a group of medicines that significantly reduce stomach acid production. Excess acid production causes diseases related to the stomach and intestines. PPIs are used to treat such disorders.

How to use

Read the medicine guide provided by your pharmacist, your doctor, or the medicine company. If you have any questions related to Lansoprazole, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Use Lansoprazole as per the instructions provided by your doctor.
Lansoprazole is used before food. Lansoprazole should be taken whole with full glass of water. This medicine should not be chewed or crushed.
The typical dose of Lansoprazole for adults is 30 mg once daily for 1-4 weeks. The usual dose for children is 15-30 mg for 12 weeks. This medicine is generally used for a period of 7-14 days for the stomach infection and small intestine ulcers caused by bacteria (Helicobacter pylori), 4 weeks for small intestine ulcer (duodenal ulcer), 8 weeks for healing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs associated stomach ulcer, 8 weeks for cancer of stomach ulcer (active benign gastric ulcer), 12 weeks for risk reduction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs associated stomach ulcer, 8 weeks for symptoms of backflow of stomach acid to the food pipe (also called, gastroesophageal reflux disease), 8 weeks for esophagus inflammation (erosive esophagitis), 12 weeks for symptoms of backflow of stomach acid to the food pipe (for 1 to 11 years (≤ 30 kg or > 30 kg body weight/13.6 lb)), 4 weeks for stomach ulcer, and 4-8 weeks for acid reflux from the stomach (reflux oesophagitis). This medicine is not known to be addictive or habit-forming.
This medicine is to be used for longer periods of time. Lansoprazole may be prescribed for the long-term maintenance treatment of stomach ulcers, inflammation of the lining of the esophagus (erosive esophagitis) and for hypersecretory conditions like overproduction of stomach acid (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome). Lansoprazole should be used as directed by the doctor even if you feel well, or even if you think that there is no need for you to use your medicine.
Discuss with your doctor if your condition worsens. Discuss with your doctor if serious stomach problems, watery stool, stomach pain, and fever. If you have issues with the health of your liver, The daily dose should be reduced to 50% in patients with abnormal functioning of the liver.
Taking a higher dose of this medicine may increase the risk of side-effects. A lower dose of this medicine may be recommended to reduce the risk of side-effects.
If you are giving Lansoprazole to a child, be sure to use a product that is for use in children. Use the child's weight or age to find the right dose from the product package or medicine label. You can also read the dosage section of this page to know the correct dose for your child. Else, consult with your doctor and follow their recommendation.
If using the orally-disintegrating form of this medicine, make sure you do not consume any food or fluid 5 minutes before or after taking this medicine. Before taking the medicine out of the package, wash your hands thoroughly. Place the medicine on the tongue. Make sure you do not chew or swallow the medicine. You do not need to drink water after consuming the medicine. In certain cases, the medicine can taste slightly bitter. Also, ensure that you do not break or split the medicine.
If using the delayed-release form of this medicine, do not crush or chew the medicine, unless indicated on the package. Crushing or chewing of the medicine can result in unpleasant taste resulting in patients not following the medicine schedule. Crushing or chewing can also release all of the medicine at once, resulting in a decrease of effectiveness and a possible increase in side-effects.
If using the liquid form of this medicine, measure the dose using the provided measuring cup, spoon, or dropper. Before pouring the medicine into the measuring device, you should check the measurement markings carefully. Then, pour the dose amount into the device. After use, clean and store the measuring device in a safe place for your next use. You should not use a tablespoon or teaspoon as the dose measuring devices since it can result in an incorrect dose. If indicated on the product package, shake the medicine before use.
Lansoprazole injection is intended for intravenous (into the vein) use only. Injection is slowly injected over 30 minutes. Before injecting Lansoprazole the injection should be properly cleared with 5% Dextrose Injection, Lactated Ringer’s Injection, and 0.9% sodium chloride Injection. After injecting Lansoprazole, the device such as filter should be removed and discarded. Clear the device with 5% Dextrose Injection, lactated Ringer’s Injection and 0.9% sodium chloride Injection.
Before beginning the use of this medicine, your doctor may ask you to undergo medical/lab tests (Magnesium, and Antibiotic Susceptibility) to monitor for side-effects. Once the administration of the medicine begins, your doctor should monitor you to make sure that the side-effects of this medicine are not impacting your health. Your doctor may request that specific lab tests be performed before you start using Lansoprazole. Your doctor may ask you to undergo Magnesium test. Magnesium level should be checked before starting the treatment because low magnesium can happen in individuals who take a proton pump inhibitor medicine for at least three months. Your doctor may request Antibiotic Susceptibility test. This test is done to check the sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics.
Medicines may be recommended for uses other than those listed in the medicine guide. You should not use Lansoprazole for conditions or symptoms for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Lansoprazole to other people, even if they have the same conditions or symptoms that you have. The use of this medicine without the advice of a doctor may cause harm.
Follow storage instructions on the product package if available. Store Lansoprazole at room temperature between 20°C to 25°C (68°F to 77°F), away from moisture, and away from heat. Store this medicine away from children and pets.
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How to take Lansoprazole

The dose and frequency of using Lansoprazole will depend on the following factors:
  • age of the patient
  • the weight of the patient
  • patient's health
  • the health of the patient's kidneys
  • medicines recommended by the doctor
  • any other medicines being used
  • herbal supplements being used
  • response to the medicine

Lansoprazole Dosage

Dosage for active small intestine ulcer (duodenal ulcer)

Adult
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily for 4 weeks (for short-term treatment) and 30 mg once daily for 2 weeks

Dosage for maintenance of healed small intestinal ulcers (duodenal ulcers)

Adult
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily

Dosage for short-term treatment of cancer of stomach ulcer (active benign gastric ulcer)

Adult
  • Recommended: 30 mg once daily up to 8 weeks

Dosage for healing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs associated stomach ulcers

Adult
  • Recommended: 30 mg once daily up to 8 weeks

Dosage for risk reduction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs associated stomach ulcers

Adult
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily up to 12 weeks

Dosage for short-term treatment of symptoms of backflow of stomach acid to the food pipe (also called, gastroesophageal reflux disease)

Adult
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily up to 8 weeks
Children (12 to 17 years)
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily up to 8 weeks
Children (1 to 11 years (weight less than or equal to 30 kg or 66.1 lb))
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily up to 12 weeks
Children (1 to 11 years (weight greater than 30 kg or 66.1 lb))
  • Recommended: 30 mg once daily up to 12 weeks

Dosage for short-term treatment of esophagus inflammation (erosive esophagitis)

Adult
  • Recommended: 30 mg once daily up to 8 weeks
Children (12 to 17 years)
  • Recommended: 30 mg once daily up to 8 weeks
Children (1 to 11 years (weight less than or equal to 30 kg or 66.1 lb))
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily up to 12 weeks
Children (1 to 11 years (weight greater than 30 kg or 66.1 lb))
  • Recommended: 30 mg once daily up to 12 weeks

Dosage for maintenance of healing of esophagus inflammation (erosive esophagitis)

Adult
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily

Dosage for long-term treatment of overproduction of gastric acid (Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome)

Adult
  • Initial: 60 mg once daily
  • Maximum: 180 mg/day

Dosage for Helicobacter pylori bacterial eradication to reduce recurrence of intestinal ulcers

Adult
  • Recommended: Lansoprazole 30 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily for 10 or 14 days (triple therapy) and Lansoprazole 30 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg three times daily for 14 days (dual therapy)

Dosage for stomach ulcers due to bacterial infection (eradication of Helicobacter pylori)

Adult
  • Recommended: Lansoprazole 30 mg, clarithromycin 250 mg, and metronidazole 400-500 mg twice daily for 7 days

Dosage for stomach ulcer (gastric ulcer)

Adult
  • Recommended: 30 mg once daily for 4 weeks

Dosage for acid reflux from the stomach (reflux oesophagitis)

Adult
  • Recommended: 30 mg once daily for 4 weeks

Dosage for prevention of conditions of acid reflux from the stomach (reflux oesophagitis)

Adult
  • Recommended: 15 mg once daily
  • Maximum: 30 mg/day

Minimum Age

1 year

Dosage calculation for children

To calculate the dosage for children please use the weight based dose calculator to calculate the appropriate dosage as per the weight of your child.

Forms

Tablet, orally disintegrating
Strength: 15 mg, 30 mg
Tablet, orally disintegrating, delayed release
Strength: 15 mg, 30 mg
Tablet, delayed release
Strength: 15 mg, 30 mg
Suspension
Strength: 15 mg, 30 mg
Injection, powder, for solution
Strength: 30 mg/5mL
Capsule, delayed release pellets
Strength: 15 mg, 30 mg
Capsule, delayed release
Strength: 15 mg, 30 mg

Special Instructions

Lansoprazole delayed-release orally disintegrating tablets
Do not chew, crush, cut or break tablets. Put the tablet on the tongue. Allow the tablet to dissolve, with or without water and swallow after it dissolves.
Lansoprazole delayed-release orally disintegrating tablets with an oral syringe
Take a 15 mg tablet in an oral syringe and add 4 ml of water, for 30 mg tablet, take 8 ml of water. Shake this syringe properly to dissolve the tablet and use it within 15 minutes after it has properly dissolved. Refill the syringe with 2 ml water (5 ml for 30 mg tablet) to make sure that entire dose has to be taken.
Lansoprazole delayed-release tablets through a nasogastric tube (NG tube)
Take a 15 mg tablet in a syringe and add 4 ml of water, for 30 mg tablet, take 8 ml of water. Shake this syringe properly to mix the tablet and use it within 15 minutes through the nasogastric (NG) tube into the stomach after it has properly dissolved. Refill the syringe about 5 ml of water, mix and take this mixture again to make sure that entire dose has to be taken.
delayed-release capsules through a nasogastric tube (NG tube)
Open the Lansoprazole delayed-release capsule and empty the capsule contents (granules) into a syringe. Do not break or crush these granules and mix them with 40 ml of apple juice. Do not use liquids other than apple juice. Attach this syringe to a nasogastric tube (NG tube) and give the medicine through the NG tube into the stomach. Refill the syringe with more apple juice, mix and take this mixture again to make sure the entire dose has to be taken.
Lansoprazole I.V. injection
Discontinue the use of Lansoprazole i.v. injection as soon as the patient is able to resume treatment with Lansoprazole oral formulations.

Missed Dose

A missed dose should be taken as early as you remember it. However, if the time for the next dose is almost there, then the missed dose should be skipped, and the regular dosing schedule should be continued. Avoid taking a double dose to make up for a missed dose.

Overdose

What to do if you overdose on Lansoprazole?
If necessary, stomach emptying, charcoal and symptomatic (treatment according to the symptoms) treatment is given to reduce the overdose effect.
If you think you have overdosed on Lansoprazole, call a poison control center immediately. You can look up the poison control center information from the Poison Center Finder at TabletWise.com.

Precautions while using Lansoprazole

Before you use Lansoprazole, tell your doctor if you are allergic to it or its ingredients. Your doctor may prescribe an alternative medicine and update your medical records to record this information.
Before you use Lansoprazole, tell your doctor of your medical history including liver problems, abnormal functioning of the liver, patients allergic to Lansoprazole or similar medicine that decreases stomach acid, stomach, intestine or duodenal ulcer, low levels of magnesium in the blood, phenylalanine build-up in the body (phenylketonuria), planning to have blood test of Chromogranin A, patients taking corticosteroids, weak or brittle joint (osteoporosis), patients taking digoxin, itraconazole, iron salts, methotrexate, St John´s wort, ampicillin, ketoconazole, rifampicin, theophylline, atanazavir, warfarin, fluoxamine, methotrexate, rilpivirine, or sucralfate, low levels of vitamin B-12 in your body, or an autoimmune disease (condition in which the body attacks its own organs, causing swelling and loss of function) such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Using Lansoprazole in patients with liver problems or abnormal functioning of the liver may increase the exposure of this medicine. Patients with stomach, intestine or duodenal ulcer are at increased risk of stomach ulcer due to the presence of bacteria (Helicobacter pylori) when using Lansoprazole. Patients allergic to similar medicines that reduce stomach acid may experience skin rash or pain in joints. Patients with a history of weak or brittle joints (osteoporosis) are at increased risk of fracture in the hip, spine or wrist when using Lansoprazole. Patients with low magnesium levels in the blood may experience seizures, abnormal or fast heartbeat, dizziness, muscle weakness, cramps or muscle aches, nervousness (jitteriness), spasms of the hands and feet, spasm of the voice box when using Lansoprazole. Using Lansoprazole with digoxin, ampicillin esters, ketoconazole, iron salts may decrease the absorption of these medicines. Using Lansoprazole with rifampicin and St John´s wort decreases the absorption of Lansoprazole. Using Lansoprazole with theophylline increase the clearance of theophylline. Using Lansoprazole with atazanavir may decrease the effectiveness of atazanavir. Using Lansoprazole with warfarin may increase the prothrombin time and risk of stomach and intestinal disorders. Using Lansoprazole with fluvoxamine may increase the level of Lansoprazole. The use of sucralfate may decrease the absorption of Lansoprazole in the blood. The use of Lansoprazole with methotrexate may increase the level of methotrexate in the blood.
The use of this medicine may change magnesium. Magnesium levels should be checked before starting the treatment because low levels of magnesium can happen in individuals who take a proton pump inhibitor medicine for at least three months.
The use of Lansoprazole may change blood clotting parameter. Using Lansoprazole with warfarin increases the blood clotting parameter (International Normalized Ratio (INR) and prothrombin time), which may lead to abnormal bleeding and fatal. Patients should be monitored for the blood clotting parameters.
The use of this medicine may change liver parameters (such as aspartate transaminase (SGOT or AST), alanine transaminase (SGPT or ALT), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGTP), creatinine, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase). Increase in the level of aspartate transaminase (SGOT or AST), alanine transaminase (SGPT or ALT), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGTP), bilirubin, creatinine, and alkaline phosphatase may be observed in patients taking Lansoprazole.
The use of this medicine may change blood parameters (such as white blood cells (WBC), globulin, albumin to globulin ratio (A/G ratio), red blood cells (RBC), blood potassium, blood urea, hemoglobin, lipid, cholestrol, electrolytes, glucocorticoids, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), platelets). Increase or decrease or abnormal levels of white blood cells, increase in potassium, increase in blood urea, decrease in hemoglobin, increase in lipid (hyperlipemia), increase in cholesterol, increase or decrease electrolyte, increase glucocorticoids, increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), increase or decrease or abnormal platelets levels may be observed in patients taking Lansoprazole therapy.
The use of Lansoprazole may change urine parameters (such as crystal urea, albuminuria, glycosuria, hematuria). Increase in the levels of crystals in the urine (crystal urea), albumin in urine (albuminuria), glucose in urine (glycosuria), blood in the urine (hematuria) may be observed in patients taking Lansoprazole therapy.
Lansoprazole should be used in pregnancy only when required. There are no sufficient clinical data available in pregnant women. Lansoprazole should be used during pregnancy only after considering the importance of the drug to mother. Lansoprazole should be used while breastfeeding only when required. It is unknown whether Lansoprazole may pass into breast milk which may cause harmful effects in children. A decision to discontinue Lansoprazole or breastfeeding should be made after considering the importance of medicine to the mother. It is not known if this medicine is safe for use in women who are conceiving. Consult with your doctor before you use Lansoprazole. It is unknown whether Lansoprazole may harm the unborn baby.
Lansoprazole can make you feel sleepy. Be careful while driving, using machinery, or doing any other activity that needs you to be alert. The consumption of alcohol with Lansoprazole can make you feel more sleepy. Lansoprazole may cause seizures in some people. Discuss with your doctor if you perform activities where a loss of consciousness may cause you or others harm.
This medicine can cause stomach bleeding. The use of alcohol/tobacco with Lansoprazole may increase your stomach bleeding risk. If you drink alcohol or smoke regularly, please discuss with your doctor. This medicine may increase your sensitivity to sunlight. If this happens, limit your time outdoors and do not tan to prevent sunburns. Cover your skin when you are outdoors or use a sunscreen. In case you get a sunburn, consult with your doctor.
Lansoprazole may increase side-effects in older patients. Elderly patients may see an increased risk of fracture of the hip, fracture of the wrist, and spine fracture.
Using Lansoprazole for long-term (more than one year) or at high doses may increase the risk of fracture in the hip, wrist or spine due to the weak or brittle joint (osteoporosis-related fractures) and decrease the level of magnesium in the blood.

Lansoprazole Side-effects

The following side-effects may commonly occur when using Lansoprazole. If any of these side-effects worsen or last for a long time, you should consult with your doctor:
The following side-effects may commonly occur in older patients on the use of Lansoprazole. Discuss with your doctor if any of these side-effects last for a long time or are severe:
The following side-effects may commonly occur in children when using Lansoprazole. Discuss with your doctor if any of these side-effects last for a long time or are severe:
Rarely, the use of Lansoprazole may cause the following side-effects:
  • abnormal change in the tissue (metaplasia)
  • abnormal dreams
  • abnormal enlargement of the neck (thyroid) gland (goiter)
  • abnormal functioning of the kidney
  • abnormal growth of skin cells (skin carcinoma)
  • abnormal menses
  • abnormal stools
  • abnormal vision
  • abnormality in the sense of smell (parosmia)
  • abnormally low levels of thrombocytes
  • acne
  • back pain
  • bad breath (halitosis)
  • black tarry stools (melena)
  • blood spots on the skin
  • bone disorder
  • bone fracture
  • breast enlargement
  • breast pain
  • breast tenderness
  • bruise (contusion)
  • burning or prickling sensation
  • chest pain (angina)
  • chills
  • cough increased
  • coughing up of blood (hemoptysis)
  • decrease in the number of leukocytes in the blood
  • decreased/increased sex drive (libido decreased/increased)
  • deficiency of a particular vitamin (avitaminosis)
  • deficit in memory (amnesia)
  • depression
  • difficult urination
  • difficulty or discomfort in swallowing
  • dilatation of the blood vessels (vasodilation)
  • discolouration of the skin (petechiae)
  • disease in which body attacks its own tissues (subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus)
  • double vision (diplopia)
  • drooping or falling of the upper eyelid (ptosis)
  • dry eyes
  • dry mouth
  • dry skin
  • emotional lability
  • enlargement of lymph nodes
  • excessive production of urine
  • exessive sweating
  • expels gas noisily from the stomach through the mouth
  • extreme sensitivity to light (photophobia)
  • eye pain
  • eyelid inflammation (blepharitis)
  • failure of the muscle fibers at the lower end of the esophagus to relax (cardiospasm)
  • fecal discoloration
  • feeling of discomfort
  • feeling of incomplete defecation (tenesmus)
  • flu syndrome
  • formation of gallstones (cholelithiasis)
  • fracture of the hip, wrist or spine
  • fungal infection of the oesophagus (candidiasis of the oesophagus)
  • gastric emptying problems
  • gum bleeding (gum hemorrhage)
  • hair disorder
  • hair loss
  • hiccup
  • hoarseness
  • hostility aggravated
  • hunger
  • hyperactivity (hyperkinesia)
  • increase in the number of eosinophils in the blood
  • increased appetite
  • increased muscle tone (hypertonia)
  • increased salivation
  • increased skin sensitivity to the sun (photosensitivity)
  • indigestion
  • inflammation of the airways of the lungs (bronchitis)
  • inflammation of the colon due to bacteria (Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea)
  • inflammation of the duodenum (duodenitis)
  • inflammation of the kidney (interstitial nephritis)
  • inflammation of the synovial membrane (synovitis)
  • inflammation of the tongue (glossitis)
  • inflammation of the vagina
  • insomnia
  • intestinal infection (enteritis/gastroenteritis)
  • irregular heartbeat
  • irritation in the nose (rhinitis)
  • joint disorder
  • joint pain
  • kidney pain
  • kidney stone (kidney calculus)
  • lack of energy
  • lack of interest (apathy)
  • larynx cancer (laryngeal neoplasia)
  • lazy eye (amblyopia)
  • leg cramps
  • loss of body balance
  • loss of consciousness
  • loss of hearing (deafness)
  • menstrual disorder
  • mental abilities (dementia)
  • mental illness (neurosis)
  • mouth ulceration
  • muscle pain
  • musculoskeletal pain
  • nail disorder
  • neck pain
  • neck rigidity
  • nervousness
  • pain
  • pain in the upper stomach
  • painful periods (dysmenorrhea)
  • painful swelling of the joint (arthritis)
  • painful swelling or sores inside the mouth
  • paralysis of one side of the body (hemiplegia)
  • pelvic pain
  • penis disorder
  • red bump on the skin (maculopapular rash)
  • reduced physical sensation (hypesthesia)
  • restlessness
  • retinal degeneration/disorder
  • ringing in the ears (tinnitus)
  • severe headache (migraine)
  • severe pain, redness and tenderness in the joints (gout)
  • severe skin itching
  • sexual dysfunction (impotence)
  • shock (circulatory failure)
  • skin rash caused by allergic reaction (contact dermatitis/fixed eruption)
  • speech disorder
  • stomach (hiatal) hernia
  • stomach or intestinal obstruction (gastrointestinal anomaly)
  • stone in the stomach or intestines (bezoar)
  • swelling in the ankles, feet, and legs
  • swelling of the stomach
  • swollen male breast tissue
  • taste loss
  • taste perversion
  • testis disorder
  • thinking abnormality
  • thirst
  • thoughts and feelings seem unreal (depersonalization)
  • tongue disorder
  • urethral pain
  • urinary frequency
  • urinary urgency
  • urination problems
  • visual disturbances
  • visual field defect
  • visual hallucinations
  • vomiting of blood (hematemesis)
  • weight gain/loss
  • whitish or yellowish vaginal discharge (leukorrhea)
  • yeast infection found in the mouth intestinal tract (gastrointestinal moniliasis)
The following severe side-effects may also occur when using Lansoprazole:
  • eye disorders
    Symptoms: blurred vision, cloudy lens (cataract), inflammation of the eye (conjunctivitis) optic nerve damage (glaucoma)
  • nervous system disorders
    Symptoms: agitation, anxiety, convulsion drowsiness
  • metabolism and nutritional disorders (such as hypomagnesaemia)
    Symptoms: fatigue, muscular spasms (tetany), state of confusion (delirium), convulsions, dizziness, increased or decreased heartbeat (ventricular arrhythmia), muscle weakness, cramps or muscle aches spasm of the voice box
    Patients should be monitored for magnesium levels, and treatment of low magnesium level in the blood can be improved by magnesium replacement or discontinuation of Lansoprazole.
  • Symptoms: lack of granulocytes, premature destruction of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia), deficiency of blood cell (aplastic anemia), abnormally low count of neutrophils, deficiency red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets serious blood disorder
  • stomach or intestinal disorders
    Symptoms: narrowing of the esophagus (esophageal stenosis), esophageal ulcer, esophagus inflammation (esophagitis), inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), inflammation in the digestive tract (colitis), stomach inflammation (gastritis), stomach and intestinal bleeding (gastrointestinal hemorrhage), rectal bleeding (rectal hemorrhage) eating disorder (anorexia)
  • liver disorders
    Symptoms: drug-induced liver injury, inflammation of the liver (hepatitis) jaundice
  • skin disorders (possible fatal)
    Symptoms: life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions), life-threatening skin reaction (Stevens-Johnson Syndrome), life-threatening drug-induced skin reaction (harmful epidermal necrolysis), swelling of the lower layer of skin allergic reaction by an infection (erythema multiforme)
  • Symptoms: infection of the lungs (pneumonia), upper respiratory inflammation/infection, inflammation within the nasal passage (sinusitis), extrathoracic airway obstruction (stridor), scarring in the lungs (lung fibrosis), shortness of breath (asthma), breathing difficulty (dyspnea), bleeding from the nasal cavity (epistaxis) inflammation of the pharynx (pharyngitis)
  • endocrine disorders
    Symptoms: high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia/diabetes mellitus), low blood glucose (hypoglycemia), low thyroid hormones production (hypothyroidism) dehydration
Your doctor has prescribed this Lansoprazole because they have judged that the benefits outweigh the risks posed by side-effects. Many people using this medicine do not have serious side-effects. This is not a complete list of possible side-effects for Lansoprazole.
If you experience side-effects or notice other side-effects not listed above, contact your doctor for medical advice. You may also report side-effects to your local food and drug administration authority. You can look up the drug authority contact information from the Drug Authority Finder at TabletWise.com.

Warnings

Stomach and intestinal infection

Patients with stomach, intestine or duodenal ulcer or taking Lansoprazole are at an increased risk. Lansoprazole increases the count of bacteria in the stomach and intestine. It may increase the risk of infection caused by Salmonella, Campylobacter and Helicobacter pylori. The occurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection should be considered as a contributing factor in patients with stomach, intestinal or duodenal ulcers. Clinical guidelines for using Lansoprazole with antibiotics should be considered in treatment therapy for elimination of Helicobacter pylori.

Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

Patients with stomach ulcer, or at high risk (such as advanced age, previous stomach or intestinal bleeding, perforation, ulcer, or long-term use of high dose of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or using medicines such as anticoagulants or corticosteroids that increases the occurrence of stomach and intestinal harmful effects) are at increased risk when using Lansoprazole.

Autoimmune disorder of skin (subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus)

Patients with the occurrence of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus on the previous usage of proton pump inhibitor are at an increased risk when using #NAME. Such patients may develop an inflammatory skin conditions (subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus). Immediate medical help and discontinuation of proton pump inhibitors should be considered on the occurrence of lesions and pain in joints (arthralgia).

Stomach cancer (gastric malignancy)

Treatment with Lansoprazole does not prevent the presence of stomach ulcers in these patients.

Phenylalanine (amino acid) build-up in the body (phenylketonuria)

As Lansoprazole contains aspartame, a source of phenylalanine, proves to be harmful to people with phenylketonuria.

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea

Such patients are at an increased risk of inflammation in the colon due to bacteria which lead to diarrhea. The risk is higher in hospitalized patients. Treatment should be started with the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration. On the occurrence of severe or persistent diarrhea, Lansoprazole should be discontinued.

Bone Fractures

Elderly patients or patients using Lansoprazole at a high dose or for more than a year are at an increased risk. These patients are at increased risk of fractures of the wrist, spine, or hip due to weakness or brittleness in the bones caused by osteoporosis. Treatment in such patients should be managed according to clinical guidelines and should be started at the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration. An adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D should be considered in these patients.

Low magnesium levels in the blood (hypomagnesaemia)

Patients using Lansoprazole for long-term such as for three months or 1 year, using digoxin or drugs that cause low magnesium levels such as diuretics are at an increased risk. These patients are at increased risk of low magnesium levels in the blood. They may experience symptoms such as fatigue, drowsiness (delirium), muscles (tetany), seizures, dizziness and increased or decreased heartbeat. Lansoprazole should be stop or magnesium replacement should be considered in such patients. Monitoring of the magnesium levels in the starting or regularly during the therapy should be considered. There is limited safety data for Lansoprazole, regular risk/benefit evaluation should be performed in such patients.

Use with methotrexate

Patients using methotrexate at high doses with Lansoprazole are at an increased risk. When Lansoprazole is used with methotrexate, it may increase the level of methotrexate in the blood which may lead to harmful effects of the methotrexate. During the intake of the high dose of methotrexate, a temporary withdrawal of Lansoprazole should be considered.

Patients with moderate or severe abnormal functioning of the liver

Such patients are at increased risk when using Lansoprazole. These patients may experience increased exposure of Lansoprazole in the body. Precaution should be taken in such patients. Regular supervision or 50% dose reduction should be considered in such patients.

Interactions with Lansoprazole

When two or more medicines are taken together, it can change how the medicines work and increase the risk of side-effects. In medical terms, this is called as a Drug Interaction.
Lansoprazole may interact with warfarin, an anticogulant which helps in blood clot formation. The use of proton pump inhibitors with warfarin increases the blood clotting time which may lead to abnormal bleeding and can be possibly fatal. Patients should be monitored for blood clotting parameters (INR and prothrombin time) when using proton pump inhibitors with warfarin.
There may be an interaction of Lansoprazole with tacrolimus, which is used to lower the risk of organ rejection after transplantation procedure. The use of Lansoprazole with tacrolimus may increase the level of tacrolimus in the blood of patients who had undergone transplantation procedure. Such patients should be carefully monitored for blood tacrolimus level when using both medicines together.
Lansoprazole interacts with theophylline, which is used to treat respiratory diseases. The use of Lansoprazole may reduce the level of theophylline in the blood which leads to a decrease in the expected clinical effect at a recommended dose. Special precautions are required in the patients taking theophylline with Lansoprazole. The theophylline dosage adjustment should be necessary when Lansoprazole is started or stopped to ensure the clinical effectiveness.
Special instructions need to be followed while taking this medicine along with methotrexate, which is used to treat cancer. The use of Lansoprazole with methotrexate may increase the levels of methotrexate in the blood which lead to the increased harmful effect of methotrexate. In patients consuming a high dose of methotrexate, a temporary withdrawal of proton pump inhibitors should be considered.
Your doctor's guidelines may need to be followed while taking this medicine along with HIV protease inhibitor such as atazanavir, which is used to treat HIV/AIDS. When Lansoprazole (60 mg once daily) is used in combination with atazanavir 400 mg may decrease the level of atazanavir in the blood and thereby reduce the effectiveness of atazanavir. The combined use of atazanavir with Lansoprazole is not recommended.
Lansoprazole may interact with antifungal drugs such as ketoconazole and itraconazole, which is used to treat fungal infections. Taking itraconazole and ketoconazole with Lansoprazole may enhance the effectiveness of itraconazole and ketoconazole. Use of ketoconazole and itraconazole with Lansoprazole is not recommended.
There may be an interaction of Lansoprazole with digoxin, which is used to treat heart diseases. Lansoprazole may increase the level of digoxin in the blood. Patients should be carefully monitored for digoxin levels in the blood. The dose adjustment of digoxin should be necessary when starting and ending the treatment with Lansoprazole.
Lansoprazole interacts with CYP2C19 inhibitor such as fluvoxamine, which is used to treat depression and anxiety. The use of fluvoxamine may increase the level of Lansoprazole in the blood. A dose reduction should be required when using both medicines together.
Special instructions need to be followed while taking this medicine along with CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 inducers such as rifampicin, and St John´s wort (Hypericum perforatum) which are used to treat tuberculosis and depression respectively. The use of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 inducers may decrease the level of Lansoprazole in the blood.
Your doctor's guidelines may need to be followed while taking this medicine along with sucralfate/antacids which are used to treat stomach and intestinal ulcers. The use of sucralfate/antacids may decrease the absorption of Lansoprazole in the blood. Lansoprazole should be taken at least 30 minutes before and 1 hour after taking sucralfate/antacids.
Lansoprazole may interact with iron salts and ampicillin which is used to treat anemia and bacterial infections. Lansoprazole may interfere with the absorption of iron salts and ampicillin.
There may be an interaction of Lansoprazole with Triple therapy of Lansoprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin. The patients who are on triple therapy may observe few side effects such as diarrhea, headache, and taste disturbances for 14 days.
Lansoprazole interacts with Dual therapy of Lansoprazole and amoxicillin. Diarrhea and headache may be seen in patients taking dual therapy of Lansoprazole and amoxicillin more than three times daily.
This page does not contain all the possible interactions of Lansoprazole. Share a list of all medicines that you use with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any medicines without the approval of your doctor.

Traveling With Medication

  • Ensure that you carry enough doses of each of your prescription medicines to last the entire trip. The best place to store your medicines is in the carry on baggage. However, while flying, if carrying liquid medicines, make sure you do not go over the limits imposed for carry-on liquids.
  • While traveling overseas, make sure that you can carry each of your prescription medicines legally to your destination country. One way to ensure this is by checking with your destination country's embassy or website.
  • Make sure that you carry each of your medicines in their original packaging, which should typically include your name and address, and the details of the prescribing doctor.
  • If your travel involves crossing time zones, and you are required to take your medicine as per a fixed schedule, make sure that you adjust for the change in time.

Expired Medication

Taking a single dose of expired Lansoprazole is unlikely to cause a side-effect. However, please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist, if you feel unwell or sick. An expired medicine may become ineffective in treating your prescribed conditions. To be on the safe side, it is important not to use an expired drug. You are much safer by always keeping a fresh supply of unexpired medicines.

Safe Disposal of Medication

  • If there are disposal instructions on the package, please follow the instructions.
  • If there are medicine take-back programs in your country, you should contact the respective authority to arrange for the disposal of the medicine. For example, in the USA, the Drug Enforcement Administration regularly hosts National Prescription Drug Take-Back events.
  • If there are no take-back programs, mix the medicine with dirt and place them in a sealed plastic bag. Throw the plastic bag in your household trash. Separately, remove all personal information including the prescription label from the medicine packaging and then dispose off the container.
  • If specifically indicated on the medicine package that it needs to be flushed down the toilet when no longer needed, perform the required step.

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